Ingredient Marketplace 2014, a SupplySide Event

February 2014

Ingredient Marketplace 2014, a SupplySide Event

As the SupplySide brand continues to evolve, SupplySide MarketPlace is now Ingredient Marketplace, a SupplySide Event, taking place June 2-3, 2014 at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City The entire event is built around “What’s Inside Matters” as consumers seek products that are healthy, safe, effective and sustainable.

The newly introduced “Trends In” presentations, right on the Expo Hall floor, will focus on the nine hottest ingredients including: omega-3s, probiotics, protein, amino acids, carotenoids, magnesium, sweeteners, antioxidants and vitamin E.

The “Trends In” presentations are included with the $99 Marketplace Pass (pricing valid until 4/25/14) that also provides access to the 2-Day Expo Hall, featured speaker address, Drinks On Us reception and Ingredient IQ.

For more information about the Ingredient Marketplace International Trade Show, please visit

www.marketplace.supplysideshow.com.

References

  1. Ingredient Marketplace International Trade Show, please visit

    www.marketplace.supplysideshow.com
  2. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Recipe of the Month: Healthy Chocolate Pudding

February 2014

Recipe of the Month: Healthy Chocolate Pudding

Natural Standard’s featured healthy recipe for the month of February is Chocolate pudding.

This healthy chocolate pudding recipe uses avocados and bananas.

Natural Standard’s new Recipe Database features a wide range of healthy recipes in the following categories: Beans Legumes, Dairy, Eggs, Fruit, Meat, Pasta, Poultry, Rice Grains, Seafood, Vegetables and Nuts, Fats Oils.

For more information, please visit Natural Standard’s Recipe Database.

References

  1. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Featured Updated CE/CME: Green tea

February 2014

Featured Updated CE/CME: Green tea

Natural Standard’s continuing education programs have recently been updated and re-accredited. The featured CE/CME for the month of February is Green tea: Safety Effectiveness .

Green tea is made from the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, an evergreen shrub. Green tea, black tea, and oolong tea all come from the same plant. Green tea is made by lightly steaming the freshly cut leaf. Green tea is primarily made and consumed in China, Japan, and countries in North Africa and the Middle East.

Natural Standard offers CE/CME modules for multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. Students and other users may take courses for training purposes without generating credit certificates. Continuing Education requirements differ based on discipline, license and location. If you are unsure of your specific needs, please contact your local agency.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Vegetarian Diets May Lower Blood Pressure

February 2014

Vegetarian Diets May Lower Blood Pressure

Maintaining a vegetarian diet can be an effective way to lower blood pressure without using medications, according to a new study.

Vegetarianism is a dietary practice characterized by the consumption of only vegetables, fruit, nuts, grains and pulses, and excluding the consumption of all body parts of any animal and products derived from animal carcasses (such as lard, tallow, gelatin, cochineal), from one’s diet. The American Dietetic Association states that a well-planned vegetarian diet can be consistent with good nutritional intake. Dietary recommendations vary with the type of vegetarian diet. For children and adolescents these diets require special planning since it may be difficult to obtain all the nutrients required for growth and development.

In a recent study, researchers conducted a comprehensive literature search for well-designed clinical trials evaluating the association between vegetarian diets and blood pressure. Two-hundred and fifty-eight studies were identified. Seven clinical trials plus 32 observational studies were ultimately included.

The researchers found that according to data in the clinical trials, maintaining a vegetarian diet was linked to both lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. People maintaining vegetarian diets had an average systolic blood pressure that was 4.8 mm Hg lower and a diastolic blood pressure that was about 2.2 mm Hg lower than people who were not on vegetarian diets. Similarly, data from the observation studies found that people maintaining vegetarian diets had an average systolic blood pressure that was 6.9 mm Hg lower and a diastolic blood pressure that was about 4.7 mm Hg lower than people who ate meat.

The authors concluded that eating a vegetarian diet is associated with lower blood pressure. The use of this diet could be an alternative to traditional blood pressure-lowering medications. Additional research is necessary.

For more information about vegetarian diets, please visit Natural Standard’s Health Wellness Database.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com
  2. Yokoyama Y, Nishimura K, Barnard ND, et al. Vegetarian Diets and Blood Pressure A Meta-analysis. JAMA Intern Med. Published online February 24, 2014. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.14547

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

USPSTF Says Data Unclear on Vitamins for Cancer, Heart Disease

February 2014

USPSTF Says Data Unclear on Vitamins for Cancer, Heart Disease

Evidence on the benefits of vitamin, mineral and multivitamin supplements for heart disease and cancer prevention is inconclusive, according to the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF).

According to the USPSTF, 49% of adults reported using at least one dietary supplement between 2007 and 2010. Therefore, it is important to understand their potential effects on the prevention of the conditions for which many are marketed, including heart disease and cancer.

The USPSTF reported that for healthy adults without nutritional needs beyond daily recommendations, there is insufficient evidence supporting the use of any multivitamin, individual vitamin, or individual mineral for the prevention of heart disease or cancer. However, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that vitamin E and beta-carotene do not reduce the risk of these conditions.

The USPSTF also reported that there is insufficient evidence on the potential harms of supplementation with most multivitamins, individual vitamins and minerals. However, the USPTF noted that there is sufficient evidence to suggest that supplementation with beta-carotene may increase the risk of lung cancer for people who are already have an increased risk for this condition.

The USPSTF concluded that with the exception of vitamin E and beta-carotene, at this time, there is insufficient evidence to determine the overall potential benefits and harms of multivitamins, vitamins and minerals for heart disease and cancer prevention. Further research is warranted.

For more information about vitamins and minerals used for heart disease and cancer prevention, please visit Natural Standard’s Foods, Herbs Supplements Database.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Moyer VA. Vitamin, Mineral, and Multivitamin Supplements for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Ann Intern Med. Published online 25 February 2014 doi:10.7326/M14-0198
  2. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Glucosamine, Chondroitin Show Benefits for Knee Osteoarthritis

February 2014

Glucosamine, Chondroitin Show Benefits for Knee Osteoarthritis

In a recent study, 605 people who reported chronic knee pain and had evidence of joint space narrowing in the knee were randomly assigned to take 1500 milligrams of glucosamine, 800 milligrams of chondroitin, both glucosamine and chondroitin, or placebo daily. Patients were followed for two years. Both knee pain and joint space narrowing were evaluated throughout the study.

The researchers found that after two years, participants taking both glucosamine and chondroitin had significant reductions in joint space narrowing when compared to those taking placebo. Taking just glucosamine or just chondroitin alone did not result in any significant effects on joint space narrowing. Knee pain reductions were similar for all treatment groups.

For more information about glucosamine or chondroitin, please visit Natural Standard’s Foods, Herbs Supplements Database.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Fransen M, Agaliotis M, Nairn L, et al. Glucosamine and chondroitin for knee osteoarthritis: a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating single and combination regimens. Ann Rheum Dis doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203954
  2. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Natural Standard Celebrates American Heart Month

February 2014

Natural Standard Celebrates American Heart Month

Sponsored by the American Heart Association, February is American Heart Month.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. High cholesterol and high blood pressure are often precursors to heart disease.

Although some people may be genetically predisposed to heart disease, individuals can take steps to reduce their risks. Eating healthfully, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, and not smoking lower the risk of developing heart disease.

For more information about American Heart Month, please visit www.heart.org.

References

  1. American Health Association. www.heart.org

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Selenium, Vitamin E Show No Benefits, Only Risks, for Prostate Cancer

February 2014

Selenium, Vitamin E Show No Benefits, Only Risks, for Prostate Cancer

High dose selenium and vitamin E supplementation may increase the risk of prostate cancer in men, according to a new study.

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace mineral that is found in soil, water and some foods. The role of selenium in cancer prevention has been the subject of study and debate. In 2008, the government halted a major study, the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) study, which tested whether vitamin E and selenium, either taken alone or together, may help prevent prostate cancer. An early review of the data showed that the supplements were ineffective and may possibly lead to health risks.

In the new study, researchers analyzed data from the SELECT study to assess the effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation in men based on their nutrient levels before supplementation was initiated.

The researchers found that selenium supplementation, both alone and combined with vitamin E, did not affect prostate cancer risk in men who had low selenium levels before supplementation. However, selenium supplementation significantly increased the risk of prostate cancer by 91% in men who had higher selenium levels before supplementation was initiated. Vitamin E supplementation did not affect prostate cancer risk in men with higher selenium levels, but did increase its risk in men with lower selenium levels at the beginning of the study.

The authors concluded that selenium supplementation did not reduce the risk of prostate cancer in men with low selenium levels, and increased its risk in those with high levels; therefore, selenium supplementation may provide no benefit in regards to prostate cancer risk and should be avoided at levels above daily recommendations. Similarly, vitamin E should not be taken in levels above recommended daily intakes. Further research is warranted.

For more information about selenium or vitamin E, please visit Natural Standard’s Foods, Herbs Supplements Database.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Kristal AR, Darke AK, Morris JS, et al. Baseline Selenium Status and Effects of Selenium and Vitamin E Supplementation on Prostate Cancer Risk. JNCI J Natl Cancer Inst 2014. djt456 doi: 10.1093/jnci/djt456
  2. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Drinking Linked to Increased Cognitive Decline in Men

January 2014

Drinking Linked to Increased Cognitive Decline in Men

A recent study suggests that men who drink more than 36 grams of alcohol daily may have increased mental decline.

Alcohol affects virtually every organ system in the body and, in high doses, may cause coma and death. It affects several neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including opiates, GABA, glutamate, serotonin, and dopamine. Increased opiate levels are thought to account for the euphoric effect of alcohol; alterations in GABA are believed to cause anxiolytic (anxiety relieving) and sedative effects.

In a new study, researchers evaluated data on 5,054 men and 2,099 women with an average age of 56 years-old from the Whitall II cohort study. Data on alcohol consumption was collected 3 times before cognitive tests throughout the study. Various cognitive functions were evaluated and summarized with a global score.

The researchers found that men, but not women, who consumed 36 grams or more of alcohol daily presented a faster decline in all evaluated cognitive functions when compared to those who consumed less. Differences in cognitive function in men who did not drink, had stopped drinking, or were light or moderate drinkers were lacking.

The authors concluded that men who drink more than 36 grams of alcohol daily may experience faster cognitive decline than those who drink less. Further research is warranted.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com
  2. Sabia S, Elbaz A, Britton A, et al. Alcohol consumption and cognitive decline in early old age. Neurology 10.1212/WNL.0000000000000063

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.

Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Diabetes Risk

January 2014

Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Diabetes Risk

A new study suggests that maintaining a Mediterranean diet rich in extra-virgin olive oil may reduce the risk of diabetes in people with high heart disease risk.

The Mediterranean diet is based on the healthy eating and lifestyle habits of the people living in southern Italy, the Greek island of Crete and other areas of Greece in the early 1960s. The diet is rich in heart-healthy fiber and nutrients including omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. The diet generally includes: fruits, vegetables and unsaturated “good” fats, particularly olive oil. Olive oil has been associated with benefits such as lower blood pressure and a lower risk for heart disease.

In a recent study, participants who did not have diabetes but were at high heart disease risk were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets. The first followed a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, the second followed a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts and the third followed a low-fat control diet. The main outcome measure evaluated was the onset of diabetes.

Throughout the follow-up period, 80 participants in the Mediterranean diet plus olive oil group, 92 participants in the Mediterranean diet plus nuts group, and 101 participants in the control group developed diabetes. The researchers found that when compared to the control diet, participants maintaining the Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil had a 40 percent reduced risk of developing diabetes. Those maintaining the Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts had an 18 percent reduced risk.

The authors concluded that a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil may reduce the risk of diabetes for people with a high risk of heart disease. Additional, well-designed clinical trials are needed to further evaluate these findings.

For more information about the Mediterranean diet, please visit Natural Standard’s Health Wellness Database.

To comment on this story, please visit Natural Standard’s blog.

References

  1. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine. www.naturalstandard.com
  2. Salas-Salvadó J, Bulló M, EstruchR, et al. Prevention of Diabetes With Mediterranean Diets: A Subgroup Analysis of a Randomized Trial. Ann Intern Med. 2014;160(1):1-10-10. doi:10.7326/M13-1725

The information in this brief report is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2013 Natural Standard Inc. Commercial distribution or reproduction prohibited. Natural Standard is the leading provider of high-quality, evidence-based, clinically-relevant information on natural medicine, dietary supplements, herbs, vitamins, minerals, functional foods, diets, complementary practices, CAM modalities, exercises and medical conditions. Monograph sections include interactions with herbs, drugs, foods and labs, contraindications, depletions, dosing, toxicology, adverse effects, pregnancy and lactation data, synonyms, safety and effectiveness.